Google Nexus 10 review: Perfect ten

GSMArena team, 12 December 2012.
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Final words

The Google Nexus 10 is a tablet that's near impossible not to like. It has the best screen on the market and is first to bring the new generation chipsets. It also runs on the latest version of the world's most popular and feature-rich smart platform and that Nexus middle name is assurance enough of staying up-to-date for quite a while. And all of this at a good $100 less than what the main rival would cost you.

If you are looking for an Android tablet and you don't have a special use of a stylus-enabled Galaxy Note 10.1, the Nexus 10 would be the straightforward recommendation. It's easily among the best and most complete tablets on the market at a price point that's just hard to beat.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 N8000
Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 N8000

There's probably a single 10" droid tablet that's even worth considering after we saw what the Nexus 10 can do. The Transformer Pad Infinity 700 has carved a comfortable niche for itself thanks to the neat keyboard dock with extra battery backup. It can't quite match the computing prowess of Nexus 10 or its attractive pricing, but its FullHD screen isn't bad at all, so if a keyboard matters to you, this one won't let you down.

Asus Transformer Pad Infinity 700
Asus Transformer Pad Infinity 700

But, as we said at the beginning of this review, the Nexus 10 isn't after its Android peers. The Google 10" slate is reaching for the iPad's crown and won't settle for less.

The Google Nexus 10 is lighter than the iPad, has a higher-quality display and still tops it with GPS (which the base iPad version skimps), NFC and microHDMI. We also find the widescreen display and front-mounted stereo speakers far better suited for video watching, which is big in tablets, and while the aspect is not as good for browsing, the higher resolution makes up for it.

And it's not just the hardware either - the multi-user access, for example is great thing to have. It makes sharing your tablet with your partner and/or kids that much easier. You don't have to worry about them messing up your settings, filling up your homescreen with stuff you don't need or uninstalling your apps.

However this battle is not a one-way street. The iPad 4 strikes back with superior graphical power and audio output, better build and a greater number of optimized apps. The latter isn't as big as Apple might want you to believe, as Android is catching up fast, not to mention that it scales smartphone apps far better, but it still counts. To those looking to get a mobile data-enabled tablet it's no contest really - the iPad is the only one to offer a version with network support.

Apple iPad 4 Wi-Fi
Apple iPad 4 Wi-Fi

Overall, though, the Google Nexus 10 seems to offer better value for money than its Apple rival. With the kind of limited availability it has, it probably won't be able to outsell the iPad and win the war all by itself but it manages to deliver an important message - Android doesn't need to fear iOS anywhere anymore, and it can fight it as an equal in tablets too.

One can't help but feel that Google should perhaps have intervened a little sooner and brought the Nexus tablets earlier to help struggling partner OEMs and the platform overall. Had that happened, things might have been different now. There's no need to dwell on the past though. What matters is here and now and we are more than happy with the package Google delivered with the Nexus 10. You'll probably feel the same, if you manage to snatch one from your local Play store.

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