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Android in Jan 2013: Jelly Bean market share still under 15%

06 February, 2013 | Read the news | Post your comment
Android in Jan 2013: Jelly Bean market share still under 15% - read the full textAs the fastest growing version of the Android OS, Jelly Bean snatched 3.6% market share over the month of January. With an increase of 3.4% last December Jelly Bean's market share has been growing at a steady rate. Despite that the total market share of the two available Jelly Bean flavors is below...

 

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> In reply to Denzo @ 2013-02-07 16:39 from IPtL - click to readThose browser battery tests don't include flash vs html5 video/content. In fact, the articles explain that plugins/flash are turned off entirely to maintain balanced test.

The tests that DO include html5 are browser speed tests, not browser battery efficiency tests.

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  • 2013-02-08 02:09
  • YbjT

understandible really as there a lot of gingerbread devices still out there. that wont be able to update. i like jelly bean. and it has lots of features.

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  • 2013-02-07 18:07
  • mqMt

Performance wise, GB is good comparing with ICS and JB.

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  • 2013-02-07 16:39
  • Kht0

> In reply to Anonymous @ 2013-02-07 13:51 from YbjT - click to readYou like Flash on a mobile device.. and you are calling HTML5 a battery hog.. ok.. explains why the iPhone 5 and its near HD screen smash everything on browser tests when it has a massive 1430Mah battery..

you know absolutely nothing about phone tech..

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  • 2013-02-07 16:39
  • IPtL

As per the Android jellybean share market concern Jellybean done good improvement in its share market value as compared to other platform. I also agree with you but Jellybean will also get good market share in future.
Android App Development

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  • 2013-02-07 14:36
  • tUvw

Wooo, over 3/4 of that pie can still run FLASH; take THAT JellyBean! ..but seriously, android, get the flash back. I'm not paying for you to treat my internet experience like you're an oversized flip-phone from half a decade ago.

HTML5 is a half-baked battery hog who's experience changes between every device, version, and browser. Flash will consistantly run HD, fast and smooth, on any 1gig singlecore 2.3+ device with ANY browser that doesn't purposely leave it out for the purpose of being a "mobile/lite" browser.

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  • 2013-02-07 13:51
  • YbjT

Back in the day when desktop OS wars were still at their height, there was one generally valid maxim: "All Operating Systems suck, but in different ways". That still applies to mobile OSes.

In order to get a "perfect" Mobile operating system you would need to combine the best parts of iOS, Android and Symbian (yes, there is still stuff that Symbian does better), and perhaps even WP would have something to contribute (although I don't know what it could be...).

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  • 2013-02-07 11:30
  • pWBm

> In reply to Anonymous @ 2013-02-07 00:50 from nx}5 - click to readIndeed, you are enlightened! Proj Butter is a gimmick to hide lag using good hardware.

Dual core lags in ICS will continue to lag in JB .. not much diff.

You need quad core to be lag free .. ICS or JB .. the difference is minimal.

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  • 2013-02-07 10:44
  • PGXj

I have a Note and find expectations far exceed what it can do and what Android provides. Fancy OS facades is just not enough given now hardware advances is leaving Android far behind. Great camera and screen of course, but thats about it.

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  • 2013-02-07 10:38
  • uEBN

i used both ios and andriod. i find that ios upgrade is much easier.

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  • 2013-02-07 07:11
  • IaUu

I've got two devices, one on JB, one on ICS. There's very, very little noticeable difference between the two.

Apart from things like Google Now, which your'll probably only use once, and Project Butter, which maybe makes things a little bit smoother, its nothing to worry about.

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  • 2013-02-07 00:50
  • nx}5

Give us ICS users a stable JB update and then watch how JB rises to fame.

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  • 2013-02-06 22:56
  • 4P56

> In reply to ikkie @ 2013-02-06 19:54 from nxX0 - click to readYou're right. Both Google and manufacturers contribute to the slowness of the updates. Google releases new versions too often, and manufacturers release too many phones (it should be no more than 5 phones a year) and they customize the OS way too much. If these problems were solved, Android would DESTROY iOS forever.

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  • 2013-02-06 21:08
  • 3ikH

> In reply to Anonymous @ 2013-02-06 19:08 from PG5Y - click to readIf you want fast updates on Android, you must buy a Google Nexus or a Samsung flagship (Galaxy S3 or Galaxy Note).

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  • 2013-02-06 21:02
  • 3ikH

I think this situation can be improved by setting guidelines by which manufacturers and software developers have to obide by. If hardware and software updates were done in yearly or 18 monthly cycles(full updates, not incremental), then there wouldn't be much of a problem.Then each variation would have a good life span along with support. ICS would have lived for 12-18 months. Jelly bean would have been a bigger update and Gingerbread would have been outdated by the time JB was released.

Logical, no?

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  • 2013-02-06 19:54
  • nxX0

Half of the phones in 2012 aren't even getting any kind of update.. Typical LG/Samsung/HTC leaving behind their users. Android phones cant even last at least 6 months. Shame.

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  • 2013-02-06 19:51
  • t7V7

omg only 12% is running jelly bean? FRAGMENT os.

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  • 2013-02-06 19:48
  • t7V7

lol Even the 4 year-old iPhone 3GS is getting official updates up to the latest iOS 6.1. Android users are still risking to brick their phones by rooting and spending countless time in online forums looking for unofficial custom roms for their phones. Sad.

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  • 2013-02-06 19:42
  • t7V7

> In reply to Anonymous @ 2013-02-06 19:08 from PG5Y - click to readThey are easy to update because the cover a limited range of products and the hardware selection is limited.

Whereas with Android you have many different ones to choose from and the main issue with updates is carriers slowing it down.

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  • 2013-02-06 19:12
  • 39D@

Meanwhile, iOS, WP8 and now Blackberry ALL show that instant updates are possible. Not looking good for Android,

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  • 2013-02-06 19:08
  • PG5Y

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